columbariumA columbarium is a place for the respectful and usually public storage of cinerary urns (i.e. urns holding a deceased’s cremated remains). The term comes from the Latin columba (dove) and originally referred to compartmentalized housing for doves and pigeons (see dovecote). The Columbarium of Pomponius Hylas is a particularly fine ancient Roman example, rich in frescoes, decorations and precious mosaics. Roman columbaria were built underground.[1]

On This Day in History

History Today Reviews Feed

Feed of all stories, blog posts and videos from the History Today website
  • St Nicholas of Myra

    St Nicholas of Myra

    By History Today

    The patron saint of children and barrel-makers died on 6 December 343. 
    Very little is definitely known about St Nicholas, despite the large amount of material concerning his life, beginning with a ‘Life’ by St Methodius, written before 847. Due to his popularity, a number of legends have obscured the real St Nicholas, most famously that of Santa Claus.Born in Patara in Asia Minor on 15 March 270, early sources agree he was raised by his uncle, the city’s bishop, after his parents died in an epidemic. Nicholas was tonsured as a reader and later ordained as a presbyter.In 305, monks from Anatolia established a small monastery with a church named in honour of St George in Beit Jala, Judea. In the years 312-315, Nicholas lived there and visited sites in the Holy Land. In 317 he returned to Asia Minor and was consecrated bishop in Myra.In 325, answering the call of Emperor Constantine, he was one of many bishops to appear at the First Council of Nicaea. There, Nicholas proved himself to be not simply a benign gift-giver: as a staunch defender of the Orthodox Christian position, tradition has it that he became so angry with the heresiarch Arius that he punched him in the face.Nicholas was buried in Myra. In 1087, sailors from Bari seized around half his body and took it back to their city. The rest was taken by Venetian sailors during the First Crusade to Venice, where a church to the saint was built on the Lido.Cartoon by Robert G. FressonText by Justin and Stephanie Pollard
  • Islam’s ‘Toxic’ Schism

    Embodied in the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran, the Sunni-Shia divide is a schism that threatens to tear the Islamic world apart. Though its origins go back to the beginnings of Islam, its present toxicity is a recent development.

  • National Gallery: Jamaica

    From slavery, sugar and the worst of western colonialism to reggae and Rastafari.

  • Lubaina Himid: Naming the Un-Named

    Turner Prize winner Lubaina Himid’s artworks fill in the gaps that history leaves behind.

  • The Rise of the Flesh-Avoiders

    Modern vegetarianism is concerned largely with issues of animal welfare but its roots are to be found in the early-modern desire to promote spirituality by curbing humanity’s excessive appetites. 

Local Weather

Quick Contact

Contact us

If you want more information, fill in this form. We will get back to you as soon as possible.

captcha